Social Experiment: Reblog if you are American and know of at least one family member (distant or not) that owns a gun.

cerebralzero:

Statistically speaking if your family contains more than 3 adults there is a high likelihood you are related to someone who owns a gun because roughly 33% of Americans are firearms owners.

If we were talking about a country like Switzerland that likelihood would be even high since about 50% of their population are gun owners.

No one in my dirrect family owns any firearms(other than myself obviously) but I do have an uncle and a cousin who hunt and own firearms.

youngblackandvegan:

Police brutality is a very unique issue that black men have to deal with
Give them the space to share their frustration and pain over the issue
Listen to how they feel
Do not derail the conversation
Let these black men mourn their humanity in peace

rainbownova:

otakusapien:

shrineart:

joyfulldreams:

senpaibowie:

etirabys:

skull-bearer:

lolatsjw:

ifonlyfor:

nouveau-brut:

humansofnewyork:

"Two other people took my picture before you, so I was already popular."

I know that some people said in the comments that this outfit was culturally appropriative, but just remember that you don’t know that someone isn’t a POC or biracial just by looking at them. Don’t assume other people’s races. 

^ My immediate reaction was to be upset by this photo because, I’m sorry, I’m just so fucking sick of people stealing Asian outfits and making them cool or trendy. But then I thought that maybe she’s a mixed kid. If not, there’s a problem here, though.

Hi. I’m actually Japanese. Most of us LIKE when people find beauty in our culture. As long as nobody is disrespecting us or making a mockery of us, then there isn’t a problem, and if you think there is, then it seems that you are in favor of cultural segregation and that is causing more harm than good.

When I was in Japan, there were a lot of places where you could get done up in a kimono or the male equivalent and have your picture taken. No one cares.

Most Korean people I know are pretty delighted when foreigners wear hanbok, in a “oh, you are appreciating our culture! you look good in that” way. I have never actually heard or heard of people reacting negatively to non-Korean people wearing traditional Korean clothes, unless they were racist to begin with and would have objected to foreigners regardless of what they were wearing.
'Appropriation' is, I think, only appropriation when either it is done in a blatantly disrespectful way, or if the group whose clothes (etc) are being adopted is culturally marginalized to the degree where they themselves face discrimination when they wear those things.
Korean people, afaik, don’t give a fuck. When foreigners visit and wear our clothes, it’s in good fun by people who are usually appreciative of the aesthetic qualities of what they’re donning, and also because we ourselves have never faced discrimination for our nationality or traditional dress.
uhhh, basically, intent matters, context matters, people within the same community often have radically different ideas of what’s okay. But you know, I think the only Koreans I know who’d potentially care are the American-raised ones on liberal, activisty college campuses who are extremely well versed in the liberal, activisty language and rulebook.

Thank you!!

I also think it makes a difference in that the clothing is, you know, the actual thing and not some vaguely exotic knock-off like most people do with native american clothing. Like this is a legit, actual Kimono. There’s nothing really in the culture OF kimono that has rules about who wears this sort of thing when. Like…kimono literally means “thing you wear”. -shrug-

Bolded some of the things that stood out the most to me.

# it’s not like wearing inaccurate and sacred native american clothing or wearing a bindi or a burqa wear you’re doing it disrespectfully and the people of that group is marginalized and made fun of for those things and there is meaning behind them that people ignore or take for granted kimonos are jusr robes and there isn’t really a stigma about people who wear them 




(gifs from here)

rainbownova:

otakusapien:

shrineart:

joyfulldreams:

senpaibowie:

etirabys:

skull-bearer:

lolatsjw:

ifonlyfor:

nouveau-brut:

humansofnewyork:

"Two other people took my picture before you, so I was already popular."

I know that some people said in the comments that this outfit was culturally appropriative, but just remember that you don’t know that someone isn’t a POC or biracial just by looking at them. Don’t assume other people’s races. 

^ My immediate reaction was to be upset by this photo because, I’m sorry, I’m just so fucking sick of people stealing Asian outfits and making them cool or trendy. But then I thought that maybe she’s a mixed kid. If not, there’s a problem here, though.

Hi. I’m actually Japanese. Most of us LIKE when people find beauty in our culture. As long as nobody is disrespecting us or making a mockery of us, then there isn’t a problem, and if you think there is, then it seems that you are in favor of cultural segregation and that is causing more harm than good.
When I was in Japan, there were a lot of places where you could get done up in a kimono or the male equivalent and have your picture taken. No one cares.

Most Korean people I know are pretty delighted when foreigners wear hanbok, in a “oh, you are appreciating our culture! you look good in that” way. I have never actually heard or heard of people reacting negatively to non-Korean people wearing traditional Korean clothes, unless they were racist to begin with and would have objected to foreigners regardless of what they were wearing.

'Appropriation' is, I think, only appropriation when either it is done in a blatantly disrespectful way, or if the group whose clothes (etc) are being adopted is culturally marginalized to the degree where they themselves face discrimination when they wear those things.

Korean people, afaik, don’t give a fuck. When foreigners visit and wear our clothes, it’s in good fun by people who are usually appreciative of the aesthetic qualities of what they’re donning, and also because we ourselves have never faced discrimination for our nationality or traditional dress.

uhhh, basically, intent matters, context matters, people within the same community often have radically different ideas of what’s okay. But you know, I think the only Koreans I know who’d potentially care are the American-raised ones on liberal, activisty college campuses who are extremely well versed in the liberal, activisty language and rulebook.

Thank you!!

I also think it makes a difference in that the clothing is, you know, the actual thing and not some vaguely exotic knock-off like most people do with native american clothing. Like this is a legit, actual Kimono. There’s nothing really in the culture OF kimono that has rules about who wears this sort of thing when. Like…kimono literally means “thing you wear”. -shrug-

Bolded some of the things that stood out the most to me.

# it’s not like wearing inaccurate and sacred native american clothing or wearing a bindi or a burqa wear you’re doing it disrespectfully and the people of that group is marginalized and made fun of for those things and there is meaning behind them that people ignore or take for granted kimonos are jusr robes and there isn’t really a stigma about people who wear them 

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(gifs from here)

ladybrun:

Hey remember all those Pakistani children saying they were afraid to go to school because they feared being attacked by US drone strikes? no? you only know about Malala Yousafzai? because she was attacked by the Taliban instead of your taxes? oh, okay. 

durnesque-esque:

ramblingsofanintrovert:

lesbianvenom:

there’s something really interesting in this passage that I wanted to point out Trelawney assumes that Harry was born in midwinter because of his “dark hair” and “mean stature” and “tragic losses so young in life” Tom Riddle was born in midwinter, is describe in CoS as resembling Harry, and his mother died right after his birth Harry has a piece of Voldemort’s soul in him that’s why Trelawney made that assumption

TRELAWNY WAS ACTUALLY A GREAT SEER SHE JUST MESSED UP SOMETIMES AND ACTED A LITTLE GOOFY SO NO ONE TOOK HER SERIOUSLY

BECAUSE CLASSICAL ALLUSIONS 
For those of you who don’t know your Greek mythology, Cassandra was the daughter of the King and Queen of Troy. Apollo tried to get in her pants by giving her the gift of prophecy and took nice guy douche-bagging to a godly level by cursing her when she turned him down. 
The curse? That she would never be believed. 
So all of Cassandra’s warnings to the people of Troy fell on deaf ears. 
And in case you don’t remember, Trelawny mentions that her great-great-grandmother’s name was … you guessed it… “Cassandra” 

durnesque-esque:

ramblingsofanintrovert:

lesbianvenom:

there’s something really interesting in this passage that I wanted to point out
Trelawney assumes that Harry was born in midwinter because of his “dark hair” and “mean stature” and “tragic losses so young in life”
Tom Riddle was born in midwinter, is describe in CoS as resembling Harry, and his mother died right after his birth
Harry has a piece of Voldemort’s soul in him
that’s why Trelawney made that assumption

TRELAWNY WAS ACTUALLY A GREAT SEER SHE JUST MESSED UP SOMETIMES AND ACTED A LITTLE GOOFY SO NO ONE TOOK HER SERIOUSLY

BECAUSE CLASSICAL ALLUSIONS 

For those of you who don’t know your Greek mythology, Cassandra was the daughter of the King and Queen of Troy. Apollo tried to get in her pants by giving her the gift of prophecy and took nice guy douche-bagging to a godly level by cursing her when she turned him down. 

The curse? That she would never be believed. 

So all of Cassandra’s warnings to the people of Troy fell on deaf ears. 

And in case you don’t remember, Trelawny mentions that her great-great-grandmother’s name was … you guessed it… “Cassandra”